BLOODSCRIBE
“PROLOGUE TO THE APOCALYPSE”
GORE HOUSE PRODUCTIONS
    
The debut full length by Californian five piece,
BLOODSCRIBE, is a blistering 26
minutes of nothing but brutal, heavy, Death Metal.  No intros, no outros, no bullshit,
PERIOD.  Just brutal, straightforward, guttural, Death Metal, done much in the vein of a
large collection of U.S. bands before them. Even the intro, it isn’t some spoken word
sample from a Horror movie or an lone, acoustic guitar… Its simply Death Metal. Not that
the band sounds a ton like
DEICIDE, their approach to structuring their release reminds
me much of that Floridian Death Metal legend. They come in, they brutalize, and they get
the fuck out. No frills, no bullshit, just Death. Much as other bands I’ve heard on
GORE
HOUSE PRODUCTIONS, BLOODSCRIBE
specialize in the kind of Death Metal that’
s kept a consistent scene throughout the many different musical trends and movements
within the realms of extreme music. There’s always been, just plain, heavy, brutal Death.  
Not using much of the atmospheric/ethnic elements of
NILE, they do remind me of them
musically.  Not overly technical but certainly not three chords repeated 200 times, they do
show a willingness to depart into the Black / Death genre a touch with guitar breaks akin to
old
INCANTATION.  If I had one wish for this release, it would have been for the band to
use more of this, which, of course, is a purely personal taste-issue and not something that
everyone is going to find missing.  I found it did work into the songs well. The track
“Shadows” is easily my favorite track on here.  Evoking thoughts the once hallowed name
of
MORBID ANGEL at their deadliest, again with much of that East Coast-circa-1991
Death Metal tinge I spoke of before. Fans of bands that made the style of
INCANTATION (among others) the providence of the U.S. Death Metal scene for the
past 25 years, would find
BLODDSCRIBE’s “PROLOGUE TO THE APOCALYPSE” a
fitting excuse to get to a record store soon!

www.BLOODSCRIBE.net
                                                                                           
                                                                                           - (Reviewed by Keith Dempe)